Tuesday, May 24, 2016

kmail 16.04.1 and Novell Groupwise 2014 IMAP server - anyone?

Here's a brief call for help.

Is there anyone out there who uses a recent kmail (I'm running 16.04.1 since yesterday, before that it was the latest KDE4 release) with a Novell Groupwise IMAP server?

I'm trying hard, I really like kmail and would like to keep using it, but for me right now it's extremely unstable (to the point of being unusable) - and I suspect by now that the server IMAP implementation is at least partially to blame. In the past I've seen definitive broken server behaviour (like negative IMAP uids), the feared "Multiple merge candidates" keeps popping up again and again, and the IMAP resource becomes unresponsive every few minutes...

So any datapoints of other kmail plus Groupwise imap users would be very much appreciated.

For reference, the server here is Novell Groupwise 2014 R2, version 14.2.0 11.3.2016, build number 123013.

Thanks!!!

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Nanotechnology accepted: Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators

http://www.akhuettel.de/publications/remo.pdf
We're happy to be able to announce that our manuscript "Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators" has just been accepted for publication in Nanotechnology.
For quite some time we have been working on techniques to combine ultra-clean carbon nanotubes and their regular electronic spectrum with superconducting material systems. One of our objectives is to perform high-frequency measurements on carbon nanotube nano-electromechanical systems at millikelvin temperatures. With this in mind we have established the fabrication and characterization of compatible superconducting coplanar resonators in our research group. A serious challenge here was that the high-temperature process of carbon nanotube growth destroys most metal films, or if not, at least lowers the critical temperature Tc of superconductors so much that they are not useful anymore.
In the present manuscript, we demonstrate deposition of a molybdenum-rhenium alloy of variable composition by simultaneous sputtering from two sources. We characterize the resulting thin films using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and analyze the saturation of the surface layers with carbon during the nanotube growth process. Low-temperature dc measurements show that specifically an alloy of composition Mo20Re80 remains very stable during this process, with large critical currents and critical temperatures even rising to up to Tc~8K. We use this alloy to fabricate coplanar resonator structures and demonstrate even after a nanotube growth high temperature process resonant behaviour at Gigahertz frequencies with quality factors up to Q~5000. Observation of the temperature dependent behaviour shows that our devices are well described by Mattis-Bardeen theory, in combination with dissipation by two-level systems in the dielectric substrate.

"Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators"
K. J. G. Götz, S. Blien, P. L. Stiller, O. Vavra, T. Mayer, T. Huber, T. N. G. Meier, M. Kronseder, Ch. Strunk, and A. K. Hüttel
accepted for publication in Nanotechnology; arXiv:1510.00278 (PDF)

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Gentoo at FOSDEM: Posters (systemd, arches)

Especially after Lennart Poettering made some publicity for Gentoo Linux in his keynote talk (unfortunately I missed it due to other commitments :), we've had a lot of visitors at our FOSDEM booth. So, because of popular demand, here are again the files for our posters. They are based on the great "Gentoo Abducted" design by Matteo Pescarin.  Released under CC BY-SA 2.5 as the original. Enjoy!



PDF SVG


PDF SVG

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

DFG magazine "german research" publishes article about our research group

http://www.akhuettel.de/publications/german-research.pdf
The 3/2015 edition of the "german research" magazine of the DFG includes an article about the work of our research group! This is a translation of a previous publication in the German language journal "Forschung" of the DFG. Enjoy!

"Carbon Nanotubes: Strong, Conductive and Defect-Free"
Carbon nanotubes are a fascinating material. In experiments at ultra-low temperatures, physicists make their different properties interact with one another - and in so doing find answers to fundamental questions.
Andreas K. Hüttel
german research 3/2015, 24-27 (2015) (PDF)

Friday, January 22, 2016

Please test www-apache/mod_perl-2.0.10_pre201601

We're trying to get both Perl 5.22 and Apache 2.4 stable on Gentoo these days. One thing that would be really useful is to have a www-apache/mod_perl that works with all current Perl and Apache versions... and there's a candidate for that: a snapshot of what is hopefully going to be mod_perl-2.0.10 pretty soon. So...

Please keyword (if necessary) and test www-apache/mod_perl-2.0.10_pre201601!!! Feedback for all Perl and Apache versions is very much appreciated. Gentoo developers can directly edit our compatibility table with the results, everyone else please comment on this blog post or file bugs in case of problems!

Please always include exact www-servers/apache, dev-lang/perl, and www-apache/mod_perl versions!

Friday, November 27, 2015

Grafting history onto your Gentoo git clone

Somehow after a while I got a bit tired that my git checkout of the main Gentoo repository didn't have any real history available. So, here's how I got it back:

(Note, you may want a fast network connection for this.)
  • cd into the main directory of the Gentoo git checkout:
$ cd ~/Gentoo/gentoo
  • fetch 2GByte of converted cvs history into a new local branch "history-20150809-draft"
$ git fetch https://github.com/gentoo/gentoo-gitmig-20150809-draft.git master:history-20150809-draft
  • attach the last commit of the cvs history to the first commit of the new git era
$ echo 56bd759df1d0c750a065b8c845e93d5dfa6b549d 2ebda5cd08db6bdf193adaa6de33239a83a73af0 > .git/info/grafts
And done. :)

Should at some point in the future a new, improved (or "official") conversion of the cvs history become available, here's (untested) what to do:
  • fetch it in the same way into a new local cvs history branch, and 
  • modify the grafts file to now connect the last commit of the new local cvs history branch with the first commit of the git era. 
Once you are happy with the result, you can delete the old local cvs history branch and run "git prune", freeing up the space used by the now obsolete old conversion.

Thanks to rich0 for providing the draft conversion (though inofficial so far) and to everyone else involved.

Monday, September 14, 2015

APL accepted: Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

Today's good news is that our manuscript "Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube" has been accepted for publication in Applied Physics Letters. So what's it about?
One of the surprises that suspended, clean carbon nanotubes have in store is that they can start vibrating strongly at millikelvin temperatures without any applied radio-frequency driving signal. This was proposed theoretically several years ago by Usmani et al., as a strong feedback between the transversal vibration of the nanotube and the single electron tunneling through it. The effect was identified in measurements, and for example in a previous publication we have shown that damping induced by a magnetic field can suppress it.
Here, we demonstrate how one and the same device behaves distinctly different depending on the environment medium (or lack of the latter): we compare measurements made at the same temperature in a conventional dilution refrigerator, where the chip is placed into a vacuum chamber, and in a so-called top-loading dilution refrigerator, where the chip is inserted into the 3He/4He liquid of the mixing chamber. The overall electronic properties of the device do not change much, even though the thermal cycling could cause a lot of damage and has done so in the past for other devices. We can here even extract a rough estimate of the liquid helium dielectric constant by comparing the slightly shifted Coulomb oscillation positions of the two measurements.
However, a striking difference appears when looking at finite bias conductance and the mechanical feedback effects. In the viscous helium liquid, the resonator is damped and the vibrations are suppressed, and the unperturbed electronic transport spectrum emerges. Such an inert, liquid environment can thus be used to do transport spectroscopy at high transparency of the tunnel barriers and high applied bias voltages - parameter regions interesting for e.g. non-equilibrium Kondo phenomena, where otherwise mechanically-induced features would make data evaluation highly challenging.

"Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube"
D. R. Schmid, P. L. Stiller, Ch. Strunk, and A. K. Hüttel
Applied Physics Letters 107, 123110 (2015); arXiv:1407.2114 (PDF)